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The Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) programme was the brainchild of US educator Dr. Jackson Katz who developed MVP in the mid 1990’s whilst a student at Boston’s Northeastern University. At first, MVP was developed to engage male sporting leaders to help them discuss a variety of issues such as: domestic abuse, forms of sexual violence, bullying and initiations. Jackson’s viewpoint was, that a majority of violence is committed by a small minority of men. Whilst most men don’t commit abuse, many remain silent when faced with abusive behaviours of their peers. Jackson wanted to engage this minority to speak out against the forms of abuse mentioned.

MVP is a leadership programme that makes use of a creative bystander approach to prevention. Whilst tools for intervention are communicated, a primary aim of MVP is to create conversations that explore the role that gender, and power plays out in the commission of abuse.

Whilst MVP, as a programme is gender inclusive, in that it recognises anyone can be a victim or perpetrator it does not take a gender-neutral response to prevention. It goes into peer cultures and groups and seeks to challenge the attitudes that support the use of abuse in society. Whilst a short-term goal of MVP is to stop abuse at the time, a long-term goal is to create a culture where violence and abuse isn’t tolerated and is actually challenged.

This model was adopted by the Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) in Scotland and has been running successfully in Scottish schools and college for over 10 years.

In previous MVP programmes participants reported that through mentoring peers they were more aware of what was going on, more likely to see it as a problem and more likely to do something positive to disrupt and divert behaviours. Positive effects of mentoring programmes, have been found in;

Greater Manchester’s VRU are now rolling out the programme across Greater Manchester. The VRU is working with 25 schools, colleges, and community safety partners to implement the MVP peer leadership programme. Through MVP we can start to drive a ‘Pro-Social’ identity shift for our young people and help them to develop a positive narrative. We will seek to improve self-esteem and provide our next adult generation with a sense of pride and belonging and ultimately develop the leadership skills they need for a safe and more secure future.

As we establish our own network of MVP mentors in Greater Manchester, the VRU would like to support a strong identity and recognition for the fabulous work our mentors are doing within their schools and communities. To do this, we need an original Greater Manchester MVP logo to be used on our MVP resources and made into an enamel badge for Greater Manchester Mentors to wear with pride.

We now invite entries of a Greater Manchester MVP logo design. The competition is open to pupils and students of any Greater Manchester MVP organisation or any organisation that wishes to join us for our final train the trainer recruitment session beginning in December.

Designs can be electronic, or hand drawn and scanned. Please include the name of the designer and school/college attended on each entry. All designs are to be submitted to Rebecca.bromley-woods@greatermanchester-ca.gov.uk by the closing date Friday 17th December 2021.

The designer of the winning logo will receive a £100 Love to Shop voucher.

Learn more about the MVP programme here – Mentors in Violence Prevention – Greater Manchester Violence Reduction Unit (gmvru.co.uk)


Article posted on: 12/11/2021 09:11am

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